paleoillustration:

“Scientific Restorations” by Nima Sassani

Titanosaurs

paleoillustration:

1: Rubidgea sp. gorgonopsians preying on their smaller relative Aelurognathus

2: Inostrancevia sp. gorgonopsians attacking the herbivorous reptile Scutosaurus

By Mauricio Antón.

Pre-Mamíferos :D

paleoillustration:

Ichthyostega and Acanthostega by Alain Beneteau.

In Late Devonian vertebrate speciation, descendants of pelagiclobe-finned fish – like Eusthenopteron – exhibited a sequence of adaptations:

Descendants also included pelagic lobe-finned fish such as coelacanthspecies.

Source: Wikipedia.

paleoillustration:

 ”Giants” by José Antonio Peñas:
“A selection of bigger beasts of all times. I compose 3d images with classic 2d drawing. You can see in ground, right to left, african elephant (currently, the bigger land beast) indricotherium (the bigger mammal of all times), TRex (one of biggest predators), Brachiosaurus (one of biggest dinosaurs) and human (the bigger stupid in earth). In top, blue whale (the bigger beast of all times) and quetzalcoatlus (the bigger flying)” 

paleoillustration:

 ”Giants” by José Antonio Peñas:

“A selection of bigger beasts of all times. I compose 3d images with classic 2d drawing. You can see in ground, right to left, african elephant (currently, the bigger land beast) indricotherium (the bigger mammal of all times), TRex (one of biggest predators), Brachiosaurus (one of biggest dinosaurs) and human (the bigger stupid in earth). In top, blue whale (the bigger beast of all times) and quetzalcoatlus (the bigger flying)” 

paleoillustration:

Tetrapod fauna of the upper Triassic Chinle Formation of Petrified Forest National Park, Northern Arizona.

paleoillustration:

Tetrapod fauna of the upper Triassic Chinle Formation of Petrified Forest National Park, Northern Arizona.

paleoillustration:

Anomalocaris by John Sibbick.
“It is rumored that this painting is actually based on Laggania,a smaller relative of Anomalocaris. At top left you can see Pikaia,the translucent ancestor of vertebrates”.
And you can see two Hallucigenias at the bottom.

Pikaia… todos los oganismos se comían a Pikaia. realmente me asombra el echo de que este organismo haya sobrevivido dando origen a los vertebrados =p

paleoillustration:

Anomalocaris by John Sibbick.


“It is rumored that this painting is actually based on Laggania,
a smaller relative of Anomalocaris. At top left you can see Pikaia,
the translucent ancestor of vertebrates”.

And you can see two Hallucigenias at the bottom.

Pikaia… todos los oganismos se comían a Pikaia. realmente me asombra el echo de que este organismo haya sobrevivido dando origen a los vertebrados =p

rhamphotheca:

dailyfossil:  Hallucigenia 

When: Early to Middle Cambrian (~540 to 500 million years ago)

Where: Found in what is now British Columbia and China

What: Hallucigenia is another odd fossil first known from the Burgess Shale formation of Canada. This largest individuals only reach 1.2 inches (~3cm) long, but there has been a lot of scientific debate centered around this tiny species.  Before we get into the debate over its phyogenetic position, first we need to talk about which way is up! Or anterior for that matter. The first reconstructions of Hallucigenia had it walking on the stiff looking spiny projections, with the more flexible tentacles used to bring food to its mouth, which was reconstructed as being on a large bulbous projection. The modern interpretation is reversed in almost every way; it walks on the tentacle feet, the spines are on the dorsal surface for protection, and its head is on the opposite end. The modern reconstruction does not even have a large bulbous projection, as it is now thought the appearance of this blob in fossils is the inner organs of Hallucigenia being squeezed out though its posterior as it was flattened either at or after death. This strange form  walked along the ocean floor, eating tiny food particles.

So now we /might/ know how this animal really looked… but what is it related to? Common suggestions have been: velvet worms (Onychophore), an extremely basal Arthoropoda, or as a member of a phylum now extinct.  There is no firm consensus even today.

The Royal Ontario Museum recently put up a spectacular website on the Burgess Shale that you should check out if you would like to learn more about Hallucigenia and its contemporaries.

http://burgess-shale.rom.on.ca/en/index.php

El onicóforo de la controversia